Ataman BP17 PCP bullpup air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Ataman BP17
Ataman BP17 Soft Touch bullpup PCP air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Scope
  • Nomad air compressor
  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Trigger
  • RWS Superdome
  • Hades pellet
  • Is the JSB Jumbo more accurate?
  • Summary

Today we begin testing the Ataman BP17 PCP bullpup air rifle for accuracy. Today’s test will be at 25 yards . Before I could do that, though, I had to mount a sight.

Scope

I mounted the Aeon 8-32X50 SF scope in UTG P.O.I. high rings. I linked you to regular P.O.I. high rings but the ones I used were 35mm offset. Pyramyd Air doesn’t seem to carry those.

Ataman BP17 P.O.I. rings
I mounted the 8-32 scopes in UTG P.O.I. offset rings. Notice that the 8-32 power scope does not come to the end of this bullpup’s muzzle. The Aeon scope is really compact! read more


Sheridan Blue Streak: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Blue Streak
My Sheridan Blue Streak dates back to 1978 when I bought it new.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Crosman Premier
  • Benjamin Cylindrical pellets
  • Predator Polymags
  • H&N Baracuda
  • Field Target Trophy
  • JSB Exact
  • Sheridan Cylindrical pellet
  • A different number of pump strokes
  • Discussion
  • What can cause poor accuracy?
  • Summary

We have an interesting day ahead of us! This is the first day we test the accuracy of my vintage Sheridan Blue Streak. Let’s get started!

The test

I shot from 10 meters off a sandbag rest. The rifle rested directly on the sandbag. I shot 5-shot groups for the entire test. To begin with I shot each different pellet on 4 pumps. I’ll take the most accurate pellet and do something more with it at the end of this test. And I never adjusted the sights during this entire test.

Crosman Premier

To this point the now-obsolete 14.3-grain Crosman Premiers have been the most accurate pellets in this rifle. The sights were on in 2016, so I shot from 10 meters with no sighters. read more


Sheridan Blue Streak: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Blue Streak
My Sheridan Blue Streak dates back to 1978 when I bought it new.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Lots of pellets
  • Test plan
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Huh?
  • Consistency
  • Last test — Benjamin Cylindricals
  • Pump effort
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today I test my Sheridan Blue Streak’s velocity. If you read the test I did in 2016 you know that I had the rifle resealed by Jeff Cloud at that time. Up to that point it still had the seals that were installed at the factory in 1977 when the rifle was made, so that’s 39 years on the first set of seals.

Before resealing the rifle, .20 caliber 14.3-grain Crosman Premiers (a pellet that’s no longer available) made 462 f.p.s. on 8 pumps, where the manual says to stop, and it went 476 f.p.s. on 10 pumps with no air remaining in the gun after the shot. read more


Daisy model 105 Buck BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Daisy Buck
Daisy Buck BB gun.

This report covers:

  • The plan
  • Blue Book correction
  • The Buck
  • Made in China
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Power
  • Ratchet safety cocking lever — the anti-beartrap mechanism!
  • Common sense
  • Summary

Today I begin looking at the Daisy model 105 Buck BB gun. That’s quite a difference from $1,000+ PCPs — no? But this is a basic BB gun, perhaps the most basic there is. And I am testing it for two very good reasons. First, this BB gun is more suitable for younger kids than even that icon, the Daisy Red Ryder. It’s better because it’s smaller, shorter and costs less.

The second reason I’m reviewing this BB gun is because reader Terry Harman has sent me a scope base for one! It’s called the Little Buck Rail Scope Mount. Now, a scope on a BB gun isn’t a mainstream thing, but there are lots of people who like the idea of scoping them. You may recall that I reported on the Brice scope base for the Red Ryder back in 2016. And much to my surprise, using a scope on a Red Ryder did improve the accuracy measurably. read more


Remington 1875 BB and pellet revolver: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Remington 1875
Remington 1875 pellet and BB pistol.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • “Poof”
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • Falcon pellets
  • RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today I test the 1875 Remington BB and pellet revolver with pellets. I switched to the shells that are specifically designed for pellets and loaded a fresh CO2 cartridge into the gun.

The test

Using a 2-hand hold, I shot off a bench for this test, resting the butt of the pistol on a sandbag. I shot at 25 feet and used a 10-meter pistol target. I shot 6 rounds at each target and used a 6 o’clock hold for greatest precision.

RWS Hobby

I don’t sight in when the target is this close and I’m shooting the sights that came on the gun. The first RWS Hobby pellet landed a little more than an inch below the bull and was fairly well centered. Six Hobby pellets went into 1.527-inches at 25 feet. In all I’d say you wouldn’t have any reason to miss a soda can with Hobbys at this distance. read more


Ataman BP17 PCP bullpup air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Ataman BP17
Ataman BP17 Soft Touch bullpup PCP air rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Ambidextrous
  • Wood stock
  • Regulator
  • Lothar Walther barrel
  • Fill the reservoir
  • Velocity test
  • The test
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • JSB Exact Monsters
  • Shot count
  • Why it’s a clip and not a magazine
  • Back to JSB Exact Jumbo, shots 22 through 28
  • Trigger pull
  • Discharge
  • Summary

Today we look at the power/velocity of the Ataman BP17 PCP bullpup air rifle. But before I begin testing, there are several things I need to clarify.

Ambidextrous

The cocking lever comes to you mounted on the left side of the airgun, but it can be switched to the right by the user. I normally catch those things, but it isn’t mentioned in the manual anywhere. I watched Tyler Patner’s Insyder review that can be seen on the BP-17 product page. If you can watch it I recommend it; it’s excellent! He mentioned switching the cocking lever to the other side of the rifle for lefties. In all other ways except the safety the rifle is ambidextrous, and moving the lever completes it. read more


Sheridan Blue Streak: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Blue Streak
My Sheridan Blue Streak dates back to 1978 when I bought it new.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Clean sheet of paper
  • Changes
  • What remained?
  • The Blue Streak
  • Thumb safety
  • Rocker safety
  • Accuracy
  • Trigger
  • Sights
  • Benjamin-Sheridan
  • Summary

Oh, my! You know you’re getting old when airguns you bought brand-new are the topics of the history section of this blog. Such is the case with my Sheridan Blue Streak. I bought it at a gun store in California in 1978 after returning from Germany. I had wanted one all my life but until I had money of my own I couldn’t afford one. As I recall the price at the time was around $39. A check of the serial number shows my rifle was made in 1977.

History

E.H. Wackerhagen had a dream of building the finest multi-pump pneumatic air rifle in the world. He had the desire and the money but not the skill to realize his dream. But at some point in the mid 1940s he found and linked up with Robert Kraus whose technical skill completed the equation. Sheridan started making airguns in 1947. Their first product was called the model A and is the airgun we know today as the Supergrade. read more