Crosman’s Mark I Target pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman Mark I
Crosman Mark I target pistol.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Loading the CO2 cartridge
  • O-ring material
  • Velocity
  • RWS Hobby
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Discussion
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today we look at the power of my Crosman Mark I Target pistol. This will be interesting because I don’t remember ever doing it. I probably did, but without a report to read I can’t remember.

Loading the CO2 cartridge

Usually on a CO2 pistol that stores the 12-gram CO2 cartridge in the grip, one of the grip panels comes off to remove and install the cartridge — the left one, more often than not. Not so with this pistol. Instead there is a large knurled cap at the bottom of the grip that is removed, and the cartridge inside slides out. If there is still significant gas in the gun, the pressure will force the o-ring in the cap to seal the cap tight and it may not rotate. Don’t use pliers to force it! Shoot the gun until the gas is gone or almost gone. read more


Crosman’s Mark I Target pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman Mark I
Crosman Mark I target pistol.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Mark II
  • The pistol
  • Two power levels
  • Grips
  • Sights
  • The trigger
  • Power
  • The pinnacle of its time
  • Ergonomics
  • Modified guns
  • How long do they hold?
  • Summary

I wanted to write about the Crosman Mark I target pistol today, but was afraid I might have reported on it too many times in the recent past. However, when I looked, I discovered that I have never fully tested this airgun for you! I wrote about it back in 2005 and re-ran that report in July of 2015, but apparently I’ve never gone all the way and done a complete test. That ends today.

History

The .22 caliber Mark I Target pistols were made by Crosman from 1966 to 1983. In 1980 Crosman removed the power adjustment capability from the gun, so those made from ’66 to ’80 are called the first variation, while those made from ’80 to ’83 without power adjustment are called the second variation. The first variation guns are considered more desirable, only because of the additional feature of power adjustment. read more


The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 11

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Good things happen
  • The test
  • The “Holy Cow!” group
  • Adjusted the sight
  • Second group of Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Discussion 1
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
  • Discussion 2
  • Crosman Premier Light pellets
  • Summary

Good things happen

Sometimes everything works as it should. No, even better, things sometimes work like you think they are supposed to. Today’s report is such a day.

This report is now 11 parts long, so I will summarize. I’m testing a Beeman P1 pistol that someone traded to me at an airgun show. He included the parts I needed for a rebuild, so I did that for you in Parts 4 and 5. Then I tested it for accuracy again in Parts 6 through 9.

In Part 10 I introduced you to the UTG RDM20 Reflex Micro Dot sight that Pyramyd Air doesn’t currently carry — but they had better do so! Because I am about to show you a dot sight that was made for the Beeman P1! read more


The way of airguns

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • What makes an airgun good?
  • A few good airguns — rifles
  • Challenger and Edge
  • A few good airguns — air pistols
  • Beeman P17
  • Summary

I’m writing this on Christmas Day and don’t want to do another test today. I thought about airguns this morning and came up with some interesting thoughts.

What makes an airgun good?

I used to think accuracy was the only requirement for an airgun to be good but now I realize it’s so much more.

A few good airguns — rifles

Going back a couple years, I was able to purchase a Beeman R10/HW85 that Bryan Enoch had tuned. I had seen and shot that air rifle several years earlier, at the Arkansas airgun show in Malvern. After just a few shots I gave Bryan one of those, “If you ever want to sell this…” requests. To my surprise, this one paid off. I was able to buy it at the 2017 Texas Airgun Show. read more


Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • Cleaning the rifle
  • What baffles?
  • The silencer
  • Spool steps
  • Why am I doing this?
  • Barrel clean
  • More from Ed Schultz
  • Summary

Merry Christmas, everyone. I am working on tomorrow’s blog today, so, yes, there will be one. Today’s report will be shorter, but it’s to the point.

Cleaning the rifle

Today I will talk about cleaning the barrel of the Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle. When Ed Schultz of Sig said that some of their new air rifles respond to having their barrels cleaned lightly, the jungle drums started to beat aloud — “But it has a silencer! The cleaning patch will get lost in the baffles!”

What baffles?

And, just that quick, I have finished this report. Because, like many other airgun silencers, the ASP20 silencer has no baffles. NO BAFFLES! So, there is nothing to grab your cleaning patch. read more


Tuning Michael’s Winchester 427: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
Michael’s Winchester 427 is a Diana model 27 by another name. The rifle pictured is my Hy Score 807/Diana 27.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The piston seal
  • Tractors
  • Hierarchy of removing a stuck piston seal screw
  • Time to move on
  • Remove rust
  • What’s next?
  • Have to make a breech seal
  • How to make the seal
  • Summary

This is a continuation of the report on overhauling reader Michael’s Winchester 427 that is a Diana 27. Today I’m showing you the details of working on a spring gun.

The piston seal

When Diana chose a threaded screw to attach the piston seal to the piston body, they couldn’t have selected a worse method of fastening. A screw was a common way to attach spring-gun piston seals in the 1950s and ’60s, but it wasn’t a good way, because over time the screw threads corrode and cement the screw in place. In the case of Michael’s rifle, the corrosion is particularly bad, so that screw wants to stay put. read more


Tuning Michael’s Winchester 427: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
Michael’s Winchester 427 is a Diana model 27 by another name. The rifle pictured is my Hy Score 807/Diana 27.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • How can a ball be a sear?
  • Three balls instead of just one
  • How the trigger works
  • Seen it before
  • Discussion
  • Summary
  • Last word

Today I’m going to try to explain how the Diana ball bearing trigger works. This is a design that seems complex, but once you understand it you understand a lot about how the Diana 27 goes together.

How can a ball be a sear?

A ball can restrain something from moving by blocking it. When the ball moves out of the way, the item that was restrained is free to move. Let me show you.

ball sear 1
In this view, the ball blocks the large bar (which represents the piston) that is being pushed by the force from a spring. As long as the ball doesn’t move, the shaded bar/piston cannot advance. The ball cannot move because there is another bar restraining it on top. read more