Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Crosman 101
Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Crosman-101-classic
  • Description
  • Peep sight
  • Cocking knobs
  • Materials
  • History
  • Maintenance
  • Crosman 101CG

I was trying to report on rebuilding the Daisy 853 today, but a last-minute change prevented that. One of our readers, Paperweight, sent me Daisy’s very detailed .pdf file on rebuilding the 753/853 that has far more detail than the one on Pilkington’s website. It includes some steps that Pilkington overlooks, and those steps are vital. He also told me that the brown o-ring goes on the action and the black one goes on the pump piston. I had followed someone else’s directions and had them reversed. So I had to backtrack and switch the o-rings, plus I used the more detailed Daisy instructions to assemble the gun. I’ll tell you more when I do that report.

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The rise of the accurate pellet: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Crosman ashcan
  • Other pellets were similar
  • Competition improves things
  • Better pellets were needed!
  • Molecular level!
  • Crosman Premier!
  • Many improvements

Before we start, I have a couple things. Several readers wondered how I could see my computer screen while looking straight down. So I decided to show you.

This chair is offered by Comfort Solutions in Jupiter, FL. It was designed just for the operation I had and has a success rate over 90 percenrt, compared to 60 percent without it. I don’t want to lose my eye, so it was a no brainer. If you are interested, see it at www.facedownsolutiuons.com.

I initially rented it, but this chair is so comfortable that I bought it to use from now on. I will switch between an office chair and this one to ease back strain.

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Crosman 150: Part 2

Crosman 150: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 150
Crosman’s 150 looks plain and simple, but was a pivotal airgun.

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Leave the pipe wrench alone!
  • Different type of inlet valve
  • Velocity test
  • RWS Hobby
  • RWS Superpoint
  • Crosman Premier
  • More on the pistol
  • Test gun

Today we look at the velocity of my Crosman 150 pistol. When I started this test the gun had been holding gas for more than a year. I exhausted the CO2 cartridge that was in it and I need to say a word about that. The 150’s design is such that there is no easy way to exhaust the gas. I just shoot it out. The CO2 chamber is filled with pressurized gas that keeps the o-ring sealing the end cap tightly until the pressure drops. But we are lucky today, because when this gun was new that o-ring was made of a different material that absorbed gas and swelled up. It sometimes had to sit empty for a couple hours before you could get the cap off!

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Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper Combo: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 85
Hatsan 85 MOBU Combo is an affordable breakbarrel with nice power.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Start at 10 meters
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.53mm
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.50mm
  • Crosman Premier 10.5-grains
  • JSB Exact Heavy 10.3-grain
  • 25 yards
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm at 25 yards
  • JSB Exact Heavy at 25 yards
  • JSB Exact Heavy at 25 yards
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets at 25 yards
  • The feel of the gun
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up air rifle. We now know this is a powerful rifle that seems to have a smooth trigger. Let’s see if that means anything downrange.

Start at 10 meters

I started this test at 10 meters. Instead of 10-shot groups I fired 5-shot groups with each pellet. The only thing I’m trying to do is refine the sights and select the best pellets for further testing. All shooting today is off a rest (sandbag), using the classic artillery hold with the off hand touching the front of the triggerguard.

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Shootoff between the TX200 Mark III and the FWB 300

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The artillery hold
  • Today’s test
  • The TX
  • Test structure
  • FWB 300 — best pellet
  • TX200 — best pellet
  • FWB300 — Qiang Yuan pellet
  • TX200 — JSB Exact Premium pellet
  • What has been learned?

Today’s report is a head-to-head match between the Air Arms TX 200 Mark III and the FWB 300 target rifle. A reader from the Netherlands, Dutchjozef, asked for this test more than a year ago. In fact I think it has been longer than 2 years since he asked.

I resisted because I couldn’t see the point of the test, but I did write it in my book and came across it several days ago when going over some old notes. We have a different readership today than we had two years ago and many of those who comment on the blog today are interested in things just like this. Was I being a fuddy-duddy for not doing it?

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How do taploaders work?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • More than just spring guns
  • What a loading tap does
  • How it works
  • Precision machining
  • Pick your pellets
  • Power levels
  • Don’t do this often!
  • Summary

Today’s report is historical, and also a lengthy answer to reader Brad’s question from yesterday. He said the following:

“Sorry, I’m going off topic but I have a fascination with this [Diana] model 50 I’ve been shooting. The tap loading feature of this rifle prevents any seating of the pellet snugly in the breech. Because of this I cannot consistently gage the depth. Does this effect it’s accuracy? And because it is not snug, does it allow the piston to slam into the end of the compression chamber like a dry fire? Love the rifle, just curious. Thanks again.”

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Beeman R1 supertune: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman R1
Beeman R1 Supermagnum air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Twitchy
  • The tune helped!
  • Important changes
  • Sight-in
  • No luck
  • One last group
  • Conclusions
  • New R1 book next year

Today will be interesting, because today we will see the Beeman R1 in a new light. At least I now do.

Twitchy

In Part 3 I told you that my R1 has always been a twitchy rifle to shoot accurately. Even when I wrote the R1 book, I had problems getting this rifle to shoot at any distance. Ten meters was easy, but beyond 20 yards the rifle just didn’t like to put them all together. But in every group of 10, 4 or 5 would be in a single hole — indicating the airgun wants to shoot. When I encounter an air rifle like that I call it twitchy, because it really needs the right hold to do its best. The problem is — I hadn’t found that hold for this rifle yet.

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