The AirForce Ring Loc Kit: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Ring-Loc Kit
AirForce Condor Ring-Loc Kit.

This report covers:

  • Condor
  • Flexibility
  • Goof jobs
  • More power
  • For the latest Spin Loc valve
  • What it does
  • The kit
  • AirForce testing
  • Widest range of power today/li>
  • So what?
  • Summary

Today we start looking at what I believe is a really big deal. This is what I teased you about on Tuesday. The Ring Loc Kit from AirForce takes the world’s most powerful and flexible air rifle and expands both its power and flexibility by an order of magnitude! That’s a strong statement that I will now begin to justify.

Condor

The kit we are looking at is for the AirForce Condor and also for the CondorSS. The Condor has a 24-inch barrel. The CondorSS barrel is 18 inches, so everything you read about the Condor will be just a bit less in the SS. As you know, in PCPs barrel length makes a difference. read more


Remington 1875 BB and pellet revolver: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Remington 1875
Remington 1875 pellet and BB pistol.

This report covers:

  • Remington revolver
  • The start of single action cartridge revolvers
  • 1875 Remington
  • The Remington air pistol
  • .44 Remington cartridge
  • Pellets and BBs
  • CO2
  • Blister pack
  • Manual
  • Is this a REAL Remington?
  • Loads through the gate
  • Sights
  • Cylinder removes
  • Safety
  • Hammer stands proud
  • Summary

Remington revolver

Today I begin a review of the 1875 Remington revolver from Crosman. It is a smoothbore, but has 6 cartridges for shooting BBs and a second group of 6 cartridges for shooting pellets. They know you’re going to shoot both anyway, so why not do it right?

The start of single action cartridge revolvers

Colt came to market in 1873 with their Peacemaker, which was the first time they could legally make a firearm with a bored-through cylinder. That allowed the convenient use of cartridges, but had been blocked for years by Smith & Wesson, who made the first cartridge revolver in 1856 (the S&W website says 1857, but I have always heard 1856). When the S&W patent expired, other firearms manufacturers piled on fast. read more


Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

TR5
Air Venturi TR5 repeating pellet rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Something’s coming!
  • A target rifle?
  • RWS Hobby
  • Discussion
  • Trigger
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Pressing in the pellets
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Summary

Today I test the velocity of the new Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle. Reader GunFun1 has been chomping at the bit to talk about this air rifle, but he has restrained himself until I reported on it. Today I will talk about the power you can expect from a factory gun. I know from reading the comments that you readers are way ahead of me in this discussion, but I have purposely avoided reading your comments, as I didn’t want them to color my opinion of the gun.

Sometimes when I test a new (to me) airgun I read up on it before I start testing. Most of the time, though, I don’t do that. I want to experience the airgun exactly as a first-time buyer would. Not everyone reads this blog, and, of those who do, not everyone tunes and modifies their airguns. Some readers just shoot the guns the way they receive them, and I want them to know what they can expect. read more


Diana model 26 breakbarrel air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 26
The Diana 26 air rifle.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • This is a .177
  • RWS Superdome
  • Firing behavior
  • Trigger pull
  • No vibration
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Hobby
  • Barrel tension
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm heads
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Discussion
  • Cocking effort
  • Summary

I asked in Part 1 for owners of Diana 26s to tell me of their airguns and I was surprised that so many responded. Apparently I was in the minority for not knowing about the Diana 26. From what they said and what I’ve read I have learned that the 26 was closely related to the model 28 that came out when the model 27 ended production. So models 23, 25, 27 and 35 went away and models 24, 26, 28 and 34 came into being.

The model 34 is a whole story on its own, that I will cover one day, but not today. This report came about because I wanted to get a model 35, to see if I could tune it to be as smooth and light-cocking as a 27 and have a little more power. I got the 35, which is an early rifle with some very curious features, but I also acquired this model 26 and a model 27S that’s equally unusual. We are looking at the 26 in this series, so that’s where the focus will remain today. read more


2019 Pacific Airgun Expo

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is a report of the 2019 Pacific Airgun Expo, written by reader Yogi.
If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, tell us about the show, Yogi

This report covers:

  • I go to the show
  • Placerville
  • What’s up?
  • Success!
  • Lots o’ PCPs!
  • 10-meter guns
  • Summary

As a avid reader of B.B.’s Pyramid Air blog for the past several years, I decided to try and write a guest blog to lighten his burden and show appreciation for his efforts. So here is my attempt.

I go to the show

B.B. has written at great length about how interesting Airgun Shows/Swap Meets are. I live too far away to attend the big ones in Texas and Ohio. I wish I had been in airgunning when I lived on the East Coast and could easily have attended the Roanoke Show. So, when I heard that there is a smaller airgun show just 180 miles away, I knew I had to go. read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle
Ruger 10/22.

This report covers:

  • Mounting the dot sight
  • The R47 sight
  • Can you see the front sight through the dot sight?
  • Sight-in
  • The test
  • First group
  • RWS Superdome
  • Crosman Premier Light
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Ten-shot group
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today I will test the Ruger 10/22 at 25 yards. I’m doing this so the rifle can go back to Umarex, because they are apparently waiting for it. Other writers, I suppose.

Mounting the dot sight

As I mentioned in Part 2, Umarex sent an Axeon R47 dot sight to test on the Ruger, and today I will mount it and sight it in, then test the rifle at 25 yards. To mount any aftermarket sight to a 10/22 you have to first install Weaver bases. I showed you the factory-drilled holes for those bases in Part 2. I took a new package of two-piece Weaver bases and screwed them to the top of the receiver. That took 5 minutes. read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle
Ruger 10/22.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • H&N Baracuda Green
  • Sights are challenging
  • Crosman Premier Lights
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS SuperMag
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • Qiang Yuan Training
  • H&N Match Green
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we start our look at the accuracy of the new Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle from Umarex. This was an interesting test, to say the least!

The test

I’m only concerned with one thing today — the potential accuracy of as many pellets as possible. So, I shot 5-shot groups from 10 meters using the open sights on the rifle. I shot with the rifle rested directly on the sandbag and I cocked the bolt for every shot to make the trigger as light as possible. Let’s get started.

Sight-in

The rifle was shooting high and left when I started sighting in. I could lower the rear sight okay but there is no easy way to adjust it right and left. So all my groups are to the left of the bull today. After sight-in the sights were never touched again. read more